Join Now  |  Member Login  |  Recruiters
Contact Us 800-637-3126
Market Intelligence Market Insights
 

Filed Under: Executive Employment

Published on: Thursday, June 12, 2014

Six-Figure Hotline: Post Interview Follow-Up

Comments (0)
 
As part of ExecuNet membership, I conduct a bi-weekly teleconference called Six-Figure Hotline where members call in to ask the questions keeping them up at night, and to gain market and trend insight from the career experts who join me in talking about issues that are important to executives today.

In one such teleconference, I was joined by Patricia Romboletti, an ExecuNet networking meeting facilitator and executive career search expert, and a member asked us, "When working with a recruiter, when is it okay to contact the company directly? I've had situations where I have gone to an in-person interview and then not heard back right away. I have used the recruiter for follow-up, but should I go directly to the company for additional follow-up or not?"

 

 
As part of ExecuNet membership, I conduct a bi-weekly teleconference called Six-Figure Hotline where members call in to ask the questions keeping them up at night, and to gain market and trend insight from the career experts who join me in talking about issues that are important to executives today.

In one such teleconference, I was joined by Patricia Romboletti, an ExecuNet networking meeting facilitator and executive career search expert, and a member asked us, "As someone in my 60s, at this stage of my life, I just want a chance to work and contribute. A VP and CEO role is not necessary. What is the best way to get this across?"

 

Published on: Thursday, December 26, 2013

Do You Know Who’s Got the Lead Role?

Comments (0)
 
Ever wish you had access to an executive recruiter just to ask that one question you've been wanting answered? Members routinely email us their questions, and we tap into our network of executive recruiters for their thoughts.

One ExecuNet member wrote: Having worked for smaller companies throughout most of my career, I've built a broad base of knowledge and have training in many areas including sales, customer service, project and program management, process improvement, lean manufacturing, production and inventory control, and more.

However, the titles I have held don't necessarily illustrate all I have done or am capable of. I know if I were given a chance at any of the positions I have applied for I would likely do an excellent job, but on paper I don't know that prospective employers can see that. Without creating a 10-page résumé, how can I get in the door and be given a chance?

 

 
As part of ExecuNet membership, I conduct a teleconference called Six-Figure Hotline where members call in to ask the questions keeping them up at night, and to gain market and trend insight from the career experts who join me in talking about issues that are important to executives today.

In one such teleconference, Erica Smith, an executive career strategist joined me. A member asked, "How do I keep my résumé from getting lost in an ocean of other qualified candidates, and is it better to call or email?" Here's what we had to say:

 

 
As part of ExecuNet membership, I conduct a weekly teleconference called Six-Figure Hotline where members call in to ask the questions keeping them up at night, and to gain market and trend insight from the career experts who join me in talking about issues that are important to executives today.

In one such teleconference, Lisa Adams, an executive career strategist joined me. A member asked, "How much preference do you think is given to local candidates, even when stating upfront I am willing to relocate at my own expense? I feel like I am being ruled out." Here's what we had to say:

 

 
ExecuNet's exclusive Recruiter Confidence Index continued to hover at 44 percent in July and in the low 40 percent range for the fifth month in a row. This continues to indicate that recruiters are not expecting, over the next six months, a major change in the modest level of executive job growth we have seen over the past year. If the RCI were to move above the 50 percent level, we would expect a more broad-based growth in executive hiring vs. the pockets of hiring we have seen recently.

 

 
ExecuNet's exclusive Executive Job Creation Index moved higher in July to +21, as recruiters reported that one in four companies were intending to add executive jobs in the next six months. This is the highest level of expected job creation we have seen since February of 2012, and it up from +13 in June, when recruiters said one in five companies would add jobs in the next six months.

 

 
If you were an executive entering the job market in 2003, your goal might have been to wind up in a recruiter's résumé database. Not so in 2013. Now it's all about meeting people and making new friends who will get you in the door.

ExecuNet's 2013 Executive Job Market Intelligence Report (EJMIR) reveals that one in four executives placed into companies by search firms in 2012 were originally identified or contacted through a social network. Social executives in 2013 are even bigger winners, not just in terms of attracting job offers, but in building their leadership brands and relationships that can help them throughout their executive lives.

 

 
The June US Jobs Report showed solid job creation at 195,000 jobs. With upward revisions to April's and May's numbers the last three months have been solid at 196,000 jobs added. With the average over the last 12 months of 182,000 jobs added each month, this doesn't represent a breakthrough rather than a continued positive direction. To put it in perspective, most recoveries generate over 250,000 jobs per month so we are not at those levels. The biggest increases in jobs came in hospitality, business services and retail.

In June, ExecuNet's exclusive monthly Executive Job Creation Index (JCI) confirmed signs of a mixed view of jobs creation. Though the JCI remained fairly constant at +13 in June, the number of companies expecting to eliminate jobs in the next six months dipped almost 2 percent, while the number expected to add jobs dropped the same 2 percent.

For the job seeker, the news is positive overall but not a change in trend. For recruiters, it means that companies continue to manage their senior talent closely with only pockets of opportunity.

 

Published on: Monday, July 08, 2013

Coming to Terms with Bad Judgment

Comments (0)
 
An old and somewhat misattributed proverb confirms what many of us know to be true (no matter who first uttered it): "Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgment."

In reality, any experienced business leader could have voiced the same point of view. But the real question, and the deeper challenge for those with hiring authority, is whether individuals they would recruit would actually acknowledge its relevance in their own careers and their own lives, too.

Too often, as is now being revealed in the pathetic case of the hiring of a new athletic director at Rutgers, leaders in business, academia and other circles find out the hard way that recruiting experience alone doesn't ensure you will be adding individuals of the highest moral caliber or those whose character and professional behavior is beyond reproach. Perhaps because job candidates must audition the very best of themselves, there remains a proclivity to park one's mistakes and shortcomings at the curb and to focus exclusively on what they've achieved. In fact, many management job candidates are never really probed for insights about where they've failed, who they've let down, and whether they've actually learned from their failings.

 

 
400 and counting...

That's how many ExecuNet members have become entrusted connections in executive recruiter Lisa P's private network. Perhaps you're among them?

Lisa, President of Sanford Rose Associates, had two urgent searches underway and needed executive candidates in the financial services sector and someone for a hard-to-fill global talent acquisitions director role. She's had great success finding the right candidates for the right jobs in the 5+ years she's been a recruiter member with ExecuNet, but this time, she wanted to try something different and deepen the relationships with a targeted group of candidates.

 

 
There are pockets of growth in the executive job market. ExecuNet's exclusive Executive Job Creation Index rose slightly to +14. That is up from +7 in April, but showing no signs of a breakout. It rose because the number of companies expected to add executive level jobs in the next six months rose from 16 percent to 20 percent, and the number of companies expecting to eliminate executive jobs in the next six months declined from 4 percent to 1 percent.

However, this +14 level does not suggest a breakout in demand for talent — though there is hiring.

 

Published on: Monday, June 24, 2013

Building a Résumé in an Age of Distraction

Comments (0)
 
A friend recently sent along a copy of his résumé, asking for my input, reactions and referrals to executive recruiters I know and respect.

At first glance, this person's résumé seemed quite impressive. At three pages, it was a bit long, but it did a nice job of laying out his experience, his credentials, education and accomplishments. The only trouble was that I had difficulty reading the résumé alone, understanding exactly what he wants to do next in his career.

 

Published on: Wednesday, June 05, 2013

Wise Companies Sew Their Top Performers Up Now

Comments (0)
 
Employers have been calling the shots in the US workforce for five years running.

They've been dictating the terms of compensation. Framing the conversation relating to employee relocation. Downsizing when and where necessary. And they've been getting more out of more people, especially at the executive level.

Yet there will come a time — one that's especially hard to predict in this historically challenging business climate — when more power will shift into the hands of the most talented business leaders, and when they will have far more leverage in terms of career opportunities, salary expectations and options than they do today.

 

Published on: Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Job Creation Remains Constant

Comments (0)
 
The April jobs report showed a rebound in new jobs added back to the average we have seen for months — 165,000 jobs — and the unemployment rate declined slightly to 7.5 percent. Economists only expected 140,000 jobs to be added, and they thought the unemployment rate would remain steady. The good news is that the very negative initial estimate of jobs added in March of 88,000 was revised to 138,000 jobs added and February's strong showing of 268,000 jobs was revised up to 332,000 jobs added.

The government also recently released GDP growth for the first quarter at 2.5 percent up which was a rebound from +.4 percent from the fourth quarter and back to more consistent levels of the last year.

 

 
ExecuNet Managing Editor Will Flammé attended one of our monthly networking meetings where he found some ExecuNet members who were also part of an accountability group. Basically, Will said, they met at a networking meeting and decided to form tighter bonds and dedicate themselves to helping each other achieve their goals.

Will was so inspired by the goal-setting success this group was having, he worked with the ExecuNet editorial team to research and develop a white paper about the merits of having a "personal board of advisors." He said, "As a leader, you know it's essential to be accountable for what you do, and what you do, — your actions and decisions, will help lead your organization and your career to success... as long as they are the right actions and the right decisions."

 

 
At 42 percent in April, ExecuNet's Recruiter Confidence Index, languished just below the 50 percent mark which indicates a major advance. Solid, but not breakout, job creation and economic growth is likely to continue into the second quarter, unlike last year when it did not follow through and dipped back after a fairly strong first quarter, averaging just 100,000 jobs added per month.

 

Published on: Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Fewer Companies Expected to Put New Jobs on Hold

Comments (0)
 
ExecuNet's Executive Job Creation Index strengthen a bit in March. One in five companies continue to indicate that they will be adding executive jobs in the next six months. The good news is that companies previously suggesting that they were putting jobs on hold declined to just over 3 percent. If there is good news, retained recruiters are more bullish than their contingency counterparts. This suggests companies are having trouble finding the right talent and turning to retained recruiters as a result.

 

 
ExecuNet's exclusive index of recruiter confidence remained in the mid-forties — below the important 50 percent level that would signal a major advance — and well above 30 percent where it languished last year. Since this measure of confidence is forward looking, it may suggest the dip in job creation is not a new trend. Given the up and down of the market the last several years, we see this weakening as just more ebb and flow in slow upwardly trending market.

 

 
The US economy has improved in a variety of ways in recent months, but that progress has been obscured by the fog of years and disappointments past and frustrating current events ranging from layoffs across the financial services sector, troubling societal headlines and Washington gridlock.

The real estate market as a whole is improving. Household debt is shrinking — thanks in large part to record-low interest rates — and state governments continue to confront serious budget challenges with serious, but certainly painful spending cutbacks.

There are reasons to feel better about where our economy is heading. And yes, there are also reasons to be very concerned about where our country is heading, particularly when one takes a dispassionate look at the numbers relating to the federal deficit and our national debt.

 

 
Whether it's by choice or necessity, you may find yourself facing an industry transition. However, for the 93 percent of executives we surveyed last year who reported they were considering or may consider an industry change, it's easier said than done.

 

 
ExecuNet's Executive Job Creation Index increased from +11 to +15 in December as recruiters indicated that one in five companies would be adding executive level jobs in the next six months. This was up from one in six last month. The number of companies expected to upgrade their talent climbed from 44 percent to 51 percent. This positive shift suggests a firmer environment as we begin 2013, but still does not indicate a major breakout we would all like to see as Recruiter Confidence continues to languish below 50 percent.

 

Published on: Wednesday, January 09, 2013

Recruiter Confidence Still Lagging

Comments (0)
 
Recruiter confidence for the next six months improved a bit, moving to 36 percent at the end of December 2012, but remained below 50 percent for the eighth month in row, Being above the 50 percent mark is a critical overall indicator of an expanding executive employment market.

Attitudes captured before the fiscal cliff negotiations completed on January 1, continued to show the overall lack of recruiter confidence that this market trend will change over the next six months. Recruiters still tend to believe, as they expressed last year, that lack of leadership in Washington to create a national climate for business growth was the problem.

 

 
The economic challenges of the past four-and-a-half years have stifled executive compensation, save for the incredibly overcompensated (and in some cases, completely shameless) big company CEOs we've read too much about during that time.

For the vast majority of executives, there's been scant — if any — movement to the upside in salary and bonus terms, and far greater pressures on their ownership shares or stock options, in some cases putting them underwater for some time. But there is light at the end of the tunnel… actually, maybe even sooner.

 

 
Until recently, Mr. Stevens was a partner at the strategic communications agency SS+K, guiding the company’s consulting group and business development operations. In May 2012, he left to begin Saddle River Group, a boutique consulting and investment practice, with long-time friend and former AOL President Ron Grant.

In this candid conversation with ExecuNet, Mr. Stevens shares his views on when to follow one's passions as a career, what to do when you find yourself at a career crossroads, and other aspects of executive life.

 

 
ExecuNet's exclusive Executive Job Creation Index jumped from +9 in September to +17 in October. This change was driven by the almost doubling in the number of companies expecting to add executive level positions in the next six months. In October, the number of companies expecting to add positions jumped from 13 percent to 27 percent.

 

 
ExecuNet's exclusive Executive Job Creation Index ticked up seven points in September. This is a rebound from the low level reached last month. Recruiters report that one in five companies are now looking to add executive level positions in the next six months.

 

 
ExecuNet's exclusive Recruiter Confidence Index continued at low levels in September and remained below 40 percent. It says that while there are pockets of opportunity, recruiters are not seeing a broad-based improvement in the overall executive employment market for the next six months.

 

 
ExecuNet's exclusive Recruiter Confidence Index (RCI) dipped lower in August and continued for the third consecutive month below 40 percent. Recruiters continue to say that there is no broad-based expansion in hiring in this slow growth economy. An RCI above 50 percent would signal a broad-based expansion.

 

Published on: Friday, July 20, 2012

Six-Figure Hotline: Is Your House Haunted?

Comments (0)
 
As part of ExecuNet membership, I conduct a weekly teleconference called Six-Figure Hotline where members call in to ask the questions keeping them up at night, and to gain market and trend insight from the career experts who join me in talking about issues that are important to executives today.

In one such teleconference, Tim Tyrell-Smith, an executive search expert, joined me, and a member asked, "Despite having solid financial progressions over a 25 year career and recent experience in a shared services environment, I have been unemployed for a year and have no prospects in sight. What can I do to attract employers' attention?" Here's what we had to say:

 

 
June was the 30th consecutive month with a positive Executive Job Creation Index since the recession of 2008-2009. However, in June, we saw Executive Job Creation Index dip to +8, down from +24 in February, 2012.

The good news is that executive recruiters continue to see almost one in five companies planning to add executive level positions in the next six months. They also only see about 3 percent of companies planning to eliminate executive jobs over the next six months. The major dip in the index in June came about by more companies placing current searches on hold.

 

 
In the last 12 months, recruiter confidence rose from 28 percent last September to peak in March 2012 at 58 percent. It has now retrenched to 39 percent in June. Being below 50 percent indicates recruiters are not very confident that the overall executive job market will expand over the next six months — just like the middle of last year.

 

 
Despite a slight dip in overall recruiter confidence in May, slightly more executive recruiters were poised to consider adding to their team of consultants and researchers to rebuild their infrastructure and address the search needs of companies that are still hiring despite mixed signals on the overall economy.

 

 
The 2012 Executive Job Market Intelligence Report reveals what's happening in the executive workplace, according to recruiters, corporate talent acquisition professionals and successful executives. The report states that executive recruiters are more positive than they have been in the past five years. The report, which surveyed a total of 5,733 business executives, provides fresh insight on trends in the executive employment market, including:

 

 
A monthly ExecuNet survey of executive recruiters finds that 50 percent of them believe employers will leverage the economic climate by selectively "trading up" with new hires for existing senior management roles over the next six months, and an additional 23 percent of employers are expected add new executive jobs to their payrolls.

 

 
A monthly ExecuNet survey of executive recruiters finds that fewer executive recruiters are confident that employers will invest in recruiting senior management talent for key corporate roles in the next six months.

 

Published on: Monday, June 04, 2012

Six-Figure Hotline: Leverage the Board

Comments (0)
 
As part of ExecuNet membership, I conduct a weekly teleconference called Six-Figure Hotline where members call in to ask the questions keeping them up at night, and to gain market and trend insight from the career experts who join me in talking about issues that are important to executives today.

In one such teleconference where Rick Taylor, an HR and executive search expert and an ExecuNet meeting facilitator joined me, a member asked, "How does one best communicate additional skills or experiences gained through volunteer work, such as serving on boards or doing community activities?" Here's what we had to say:

 

 


Put down the mouse and get out of your house. Or, at least spend more time meeting people than you do responding to online job postings. Recruiters revealed in ExecuNet's 20th annual Executive Job Market Intelligence Report which activities yield the highest ROI for candidate sourcing, and various forms of networking came out on top.

 

 
For more than a year now, executive search firms have taken a very cautious approach to rebuilding their own consulting and research staffs in the wake of a global recession that forced some of them to close offices and many of them to downsize their teams.

 

 
High-achieving leaders find networking six times more effective for creating career options than online job postings, according to our hot-off-the presses research from ExecuNet's 20th annual Executive Job Market Intelligence Report. Further, networking is the activity executive recruiters maintain to have the greatest success finding candidates.

 

 
A monthly ExecuNet survey of executive recruiters finds that 61 percent of them believe employers will leverage the economic climate by selectively "trading up" with new hires for existing senior management roles over the next six months, and an additional 23 percent of employers are expected add new executive jobs to their payrolls.

 

 
A monthly ExecuNet survey of executive recruiters finds most are confident the executive employment market will improve over the next six months, despite some slippage in that hiring indicator last month and a flurry of headlines about the sluggishness of the broader jobs market.

 

 
When executives began their most recent job search, they thought it would take just over six months to land their new position, according to ExecuNet research. But when a new job didn't materialize after that period of time, our survey respondents estimated it would take almost another half-year before their search efforts were effective.

On average, it had been 6½ years since these executives had last been in a job search, and a lot has changed since mid-2005: The unemployment rate was at 5 percent, and in ExecuNet's 2006 Executive Job Market Intelligence Report, our analysis focused on the high demand for executive talent. Here's what we wrote back then:

 

 
After a bruising four-year period during which many executive search firms — like their corporate clients — were forced to downsize, these firms continue to take a slow, purposeful approach to rebuilding their own consulting and research teams.

 

Published on: Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Executive Job Creation Extends Positive Trend

Comments (0)
 
A monthly ExecuNet survey of executive recruiters finds that more than one quarter of them expect employers will leverage the current economic climate by adding new executive management roles over the next six months.

In March, ExecuNet's monthly Executive Job Creation Index (EJCI) reached +19, its second-highest level since June 2011. Further, the 27 percent of companies expected to add new executive management jobs was also the second highest rate registered since June 2011.

 

 
A monthly ExecuNet survey of executive recruiters finds the highest levels of confidence that the executive employment market will improve over the next six months since May 2011.

In March, ExecuNet's benchmark Recruiter Confidence Index revealed that 59 percent of 123 responding executive recruiters indicated they were "confident" or "very confident" the executive employment market would improve over the next six months.

 

Published on: Monday, April 02, 2012

Six-Figure Hotline: Recruiters Won’t Market You

Comments (0)
 
As part of ExecuNet membership, I conduct a weekly teleconference called Six-Figure Hotline where members call in to ask the questions keeping them up at night, and to gain market and trend insight from the career experts who join me in talking about issues that are important to executives today.

An ExecuNet member asked: "I founded a small, very successful consultancy and now want to apply my leadership skills and experience to the benefit of a larger organization as a member of the executive team. Do you recommend that I sign on with an executive recruiter, or should I go it alone? Would I have a better chance of landing interviews at the right (high) levels in the target organization if I am represented by a recruiter?"

 

Published on: Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Trading Up is Hard to Do

Comments (0)
 
I'm among the last people to pay attention to sports, but I did watch Peyton Manning's recent press conference. It was hard to miss; the emotional clip was played across all mediums, and I especially noticed it because there is something about crying sports figures that really gets to me. The movie Rudy leaves me wrecked for days.

But after the tears, what I immediately heard was the list of teams already vying for his attention. What was a sad day for Peyton was a happy one for his potential employers.

 

 
Executive search firms want to see more sustained corporate hiring at the management level and more consistent economic data before they rebuild their own firms by adding new consulting and research staff.

In February, ExecuNet's benchmark Search Firm Hiring Index revealed that 23 percent of 130 responding executive recruiters indicated they would be adding new professional research and consulting staff over the next three months, a decline of five points from January.

 

 
A monthly ExecuNet survey of executive recruiters finds that 28 percent of companies are expected to add new executive jobs in the next six months, and only 1 percent are poised to cut top management positions during the same time.

 

 
Confidence among executive recruiters dipped slightly in February but remained in positive territory as more of them expressed concern about the pace of corporate management hiring in the short-term.

In February, ExecuNet's benchmark Recruiter Confidence Index revealed that 51 percent of 130 responding executive recruiters indicated they were "confident" or "very confident" the executive employment market would improve in the next six months. That was down six points from January but above the important 50 percent level that historically indicates optimism for a broader expansion of the jobs market.

 

 
While most executive recruiters hold tight to a "wait and see" approach to matching internal resources with mounting corporate client priorities, more of them are considering expanding their own consulting and research teams to do just that over the next three months.

 

 
The number of employers expecting to recruit for senior-executive roles over the next six months is higher than the number of employers planning to shed management jobs during the same time, according to the results of an ExecuNet survey in January of 157 executive recruiters.

 

 
Confidence among executive recruiters edged up slightly in January as they projected that one in five companies will be adding executive level positions and almost six in 10 companies will selectively "trade up" their management bench strength by recruiting replacements for existing roles over the next six months. Only 1 percent of employers were expected to eliminate executive positions during the same period.

 

 
Most executive search firms are focusing on fully utilizing their existing consulting and research teams on client search assignments before moving to rebuild their own staffs.

In December, ExecuNet's benchmark Search Firm Hiring Index revealed that only 19 percent of 126 responding executive recruiters indicated they would be adding new professional research and consulting staff over the next three months, the same number as registered in November and October.

 

Published on: Thursday, December 29, 2011

Executive Job Creation Picked up in December

Comments (0)
 
The number of employers expecting to recruit for senior-executive roles over the next six months is higher than the number of employers planning to shed management jobs during the same time, according to the results of an ExecuNet December survey of 126 executive recruiters.

 

 
Executive recruiters enter the new year more confident in the growth potential for the executive employment market than they've been since mid-2011.

In December, ExecuNet's benchmark Recruiter Confidence Index revealed that 55 percent of 126 executive search firm respondents are "confident" or "very confident" the executive employment market will improve over the next six months, up 13 points from November.

 

 
Executive search firms continue to take a cautious position when it comes to doing their own hiring, reflecting broad uncertainty about the future course of the economy and how it will impact corporate executive hiring plans.

In November, ExecuNet's benchmark Search Firm Hiring Index revealed that only 19 percent of 180 responding executive recruiters indicated they would be adding new professional research and consulting staff over the next three months, the same number as registered in October.

 

 
Mixed economic signals of late further reinforce the notion that executive job search and career transition will continue to require a thoughtful campaign of several months to achieve success.

The findings of a new survey by ExecuNet of 180 executive recruiters, reveal that currently employed business executives should expect to spend, on average, nearly seven months to find their next career opportunity, while those currently unemployed may require an average of just over 10 months to find their next senior-management job.

 

Published on: Wednesday, November 16, 2011

7 Truths of Career Success

Comments (0)
 
1. The most qualified candidate does not necessarily get the job offer.
Many times, candidates with lesser qualifications get job offers simply because they've prepared and presented themselves in a more compelling way. They "package" themselves better, with an outstanding portfolio of career documents and oral presentation skills. The winning candidate is the one who knows how to tie his or her achievements, strengths and assets directly to the employer's needs, problems and challenges.

In a difficult employment landscape, strong qualifications and accomplishments are necessary, but not sufficient, to find a job you love and earn what you deserve. Don't be fooled into believing that the work world is a meritocracy — it's not. In the end, it's the best self-marketer who gets the job.

 

 
In October, ExecuNet's benchmark Recruiter Confidence Index revealed that 37 percent of 139 executive search firm respondents are "confident" or "very confident" the executive employment market will improve over the next six months, up five points from September.

 

Published on: Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Should You Ask for a Step Back?

 
As part of ExecuNet membership, I conduct a weekly teleconference called Six-Figure Hotline where members call in to ask the questions keeping them up at night, and to gain market and trend insight from the career experts who join me in talking about issues that are important to executives today.

In a recent teleconference a caller asked, "Once you've progressed far enough in the interview process, how aggressive do you really need to be as far as asking for the job offer? How do you respond to the question, 'Is this job enough for you?' How do you counter the fact that a position may be a step back, but you really want the role for a variety of reasons, (e.g. great company, advancement opportunity, industry, etc)?"

Here's what I told him:

 

Published on: Monday, October 10, 2011

Recruiter Confidence Slides on Economic Volatility

Comments (1)
 
In September, ExecuNet's benchmark Recruiter Confidence Index revealed that 32 percent of executive search firm respondents are "confident" or "very confident" the executive employment market will improve over the next six months, down four points from August. The percent of recruiters who were "not confident" the market would improve moved to historically high levels of 20 percent.

"Our latest data suggests savvy executives who think a career move may be in the cards as well as those already engaged actively in management job search should be cultivating their professional networks because it could be a longer process than they expect," says Mark M. Anderson, president and chief economist of ExecuNet. "The economy certainly isn't doing them any favors, but opportunity favors those who know what it takes to influence the hidden job market because the most attractive executive leadership roles aren't publicly advertised online or in print."

 

Published on: Wednesday, September 07, 2011

Economic Uncertainty Weighs on Recruiter Confidence

Comments (0)
 
In August, ExecuNet's benchmark Recruiter Confidence Index revealed that 36 percent of executive search firm respondents are "confident" or "very confident" the executive employment market will improve over the next six months, down six points from July.

 

 
While much of the country is focused on the health of the broader economy, one forecast of management-level job creation suggests hiring activity for top management roles may continue through year-end despite the uncertainty that has held up other corporate spending plans.

In August, 26 percent of 126 executive recruiters polled by ExecuNet reported they expect companies to leverage the economic climate over the next six months by adding new executive-level jobs.

Also, 37 percent forecasted companies will "trade up" with new hires for existing management jobs to improve leadership bench strength. Another 27 percent indicated companies would elect not to add new management jobs, while seven percent anticipated employers would choose to avoid filling current management-level vacancies. Three percent of recruiters expect companies to further cut top jobs.

 

Published on: Monday, August 01, 2011

Summer Dip in Executive Hiring

Comments (0)
 
In July, 26 percent of 154 executive recruiters polled by ExecuNet reported they expect companies to leverage the economic climate over the next six months by adding new executive-level jobs. Also, 44 percent forecasted companies will "trade up" with new hires for existing management jobs to improve leadership bench strength. Another 17 percent indicated companies would elect not to add new management jobs, while 10 percent anticipated employers would choose to avoid filling current management-level vacancies. Three percent of recruiters expect companies to further cut top jobs, up from 1 percent in June.

 

Published on: Friday, July 29, 2011

Networking May be Old School but it’s Still Ivy League

Posted By: Dave Opton
Filed Under: job search, networking, executive employment, dave opton
Comments (0)
 
We at ExecuNet keep our eyes glued to emails and our ears attached to the phones, as we communicate with members constantly on a daily basis. Behind all the graphics are the individual stories of not just what happened, but more importantly, how it happened.

I like to keep my eye on the "how," because with all the hype around the Internet one would think that's the only way people make job changes. These days, if you say the word networking it sounds so yesterday. This type of thinking just makes me shake my head, because ever since ExecuNet was started over 23 years ago we have never stopped pounding the networking drum as the route by which most of our members make a change.

 

Published on: Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Recruiter Confidence Dips Amid Economic Uncertainty

Comments (0)
 
In July, ExecuNet's benchmark Recruiter Confidence Index revealed that 42 percent of 154 executive search firm respondents were "confident" or "very confident" the executive employment market will improve over the next six months, down 12 points from June.

 

Published on: Monday, June 27, 2011

Recruiter Confidence Sags Amid Mixed Economic Signals

Comments (0)
 
ExecuNet's benchmark Recruiter Confidence Index revealed that 54 percent of 153 executive search firm respondents were "confident" or "very confident" the executive employment market will improve over the next six months, down 12 points from May.

A string of mixed economic indicators and continued challenges related to unemployed weighed on recruiter confidence, which nonetheless remains in positive territory and which has trended very positively over most of the past 12 months.

 

 
Executive job seekers and employed managers considering a career move would be wise not to put their career planning and professional networking on the shelf this summer.

Two leading indicators of projected executive job market expansion — a monthly forecast of management-level job creation and a separate reading on recruiter confidence — suggest continued hiring activity through the summer and fall. Recruiters expect 80 percent of employers to recruit for new management roles or trade up with new hires for existing roles.

 

 
A leading indicator of where executive hiring will go this summer and fall remains decidedly positive. In May, ExecuNet's benchmark Recruiter Confidence Index revealed that 66 percent of 162 executive search firm respondents were "confident" or "very confident" the executive employment market will improve over the next six months, up one point from April.

"In some years past, we've seen a seasonal slowdown in executive hiring activity due in part to corporate interviewers and/or management job candidates taking vacations," says ExecuNet President and Chief Economist Mark Anderson.

 

 
In April, ExecuNet's benchmark Recruiter Confidence Index revealed that 65 percent of 192 executive search firm respondents are "confident" or "very confident" the executive employment market will improve over the next six months, up four points from March.

Two leading indicators of future executive job market expansion — a monthly reading on recruiter confidence and a separate forecast of executive job creation — remain decidedly strong in the face of a variety of cautions about the continued growth of the broader economy.

 

Published on: Wednesday, April 06, 2011

Recruiter Confidence Showing Signs Of Strength

Comments (0)
 
Two leading indicators of future executive job market expansion – a monthly reading on recruiter confidence and a separate forecast of executive job creation – remain decidedly strong in the face of a variety of cautions about the continued growth of the broader economy, based on market research by ExecuNet.

In April, ExecuNet's benchmark Recruiter Confidence Index revealed that 65 percent of 192 executive search firm respondents are "confident" or "very confident" the executive employment market will improve over the next six months, up four points from March.

 

 
Executive recruiters' six-month forecast of growth of executive hiring activity softened in February but remains buoyant as client corporations continue to hire selectively for new management leadership roles and upgrade with new hires for existing roles.

In February, ExecuNet's benchmark Recruiter Confidence Index revealed that 68 percent of 164 responding executive recruiters are "confident" or "very confident" the executive employment market will improve over the next six months. That was down seven points from January but still far above the territory this index ranged in over much of the past year.

 

 
Confidence among executive recruiters continues to climb as an increase in management recruiting activity confirms that more companies are thinking about growth in 2011, and more business leaders are poised to explore their career options.

In January, ExecuNet’s benchmark Recruiter Confidence Index revealed that 75 percent of 188 responding executive recruiters are "confident" or "very confident" the executive employment market will improve over the next six months, reflecting a five-month surge in recruiter confidence in increased executive hiring activity.

 

Published on: Thursday, December 23, 2010

Recruiter Confidence Extends Upward Trend

Comments (1)
 
Two-thirds of executive recruiters believe that companies will hire more management talent over the next six months despite continued pressure to contain corporate headcount.

With fewer companies slashing executive-level jobs and more of them identifying skill set needs and gaps in talent that could prevent them from achieving corporate objectives in 2011, recruiters expect companies to do more management hiring if only to replace underperforming leaders with those more qualified to tackle shifting job responsibilities.

In December, ExecuNet's benchmark Recruiter Confidence Index revealed that 66 percent of 144 responding executive recruiters are "confident" or "very confident" the executive employment market will improve over the next six months, up five points from November and the highest confidence registered since the second quarter of 2008.

 

 
There are a lot of hardworking yet highly unsatisfied management executives walking the halls of corporate America these days.

Just don't expect them to tell you so, or anyone else, for that matter, unless you're an executive recruiter. After all, they're not working long hours and occasional nights and weekends with limited resources in search of the casual opportunity just to tell their existing employers and colleagues that they're already lining up their options for a new job elsewhere.

Employers and colleagues will find out just as soon as he or she accepts an offer of employment from another company — and then, in typical fashion, they'll scramble to pick up the pieces and search for a replacement whom, if recruited from the outside, may not be found for six to 12 months.

 

 
Executive recruiters are gaining confidence that economic growth, increased consumer spending and growing investor confidence will weigh positively on corporate business objectives — and management hiring plans — over the next six months.

In November, 61 percent of the 147 search firm respondents to ExecuNet's benchmark Recruiter Confidence Index expressed they were either "confident" or "very confident" the executive employment market will improve during that time, based on their read of corporate hiring plans stretching well into 2011.

 

 
Healthcare, High-Tech Lead Modest but Sustained Hiring Recovery

ExecuNet's benchmark Executive Job Creation Index (EJCI) held positive for a ninth consecutive month in September, reflecting the slow but continuing rebuild of many corporate management teams.

The rate of hiring among employers expected to add executive jobs in the next six months outpaced those planning to eliminate or postpone filling top roles by seven points, extending a positive trend but still weighed down by employer hesitancy to hire for top jobs.

The September Job Creation Index, based on an ExecuNet survey of 147 executive recruiters, reveals that executive recruiters anticipate 44 percent of companies will leverage the economic climate by selectively "trading up" management talent with new hires for existing executive roles, and 23 percent will add new leadership roles.

 

 
ExecuNet's Executive Job Creation Index (EJCI) dropped seven points in August, reflecting slower business hiring activity anticipated in the next six months. However, the rate of hiring among those who expect to add executive jobs in the next six months outpaced those planning to eliminate or postpone filling top positions by four points, reflecting a positive — if cautious — hiring trend.

The August EJCI data, based on an ExecuNet survey of 181 executive recruiters, revealed that executive recruiters anticipate 53 percent of companies will leverage the economic climate by selectively "trading up" management talent with new hires for existing executive roles, and 20 percent will add new leadership roles.

 

 
Executive-level hiring forecast by US recruiters remained positive for the seventh consecutive month, with companies expected to add more management jobs than they plan to eliminate in the next six months, according to ExecuNet's July Executive Job Creation Index.

"As job creation continues at a slow and steady pace, the real story is in the amount of quiet hiring going on," noted ExecuNet President and Chief Economist Mark Anderson. "The hidden job market is growing. Half of the hiring reflected in the survey is to replace or upgrade existing roles to fit new corporate growth strategies and talent needs."

 

What World Renowned Business Leaders Have to Say

Many of the world's top business leaders, from a variety of industries, gathered in New York City to share their views on business and the challenges today's leaders will face in the coming years. Attendees learned how visionaries from a wide range of management disciplines define the process and commitments required to realize the potential for raising organizational performance in a time of lingering economic uncertainty and a changing global economy. These are can't miss insights for any business executive!


Read More

Like What You’re Reading?

Get access to more actionable insights from top minds in executive leadership and career management

Join Our Executive Community Today

Executive Job Creation Index

Second Quarter Not as Promising But Still Positive

Recruiter Confidence Index

Recruiters Optimistic Job Market Will Improve

Stay Connected

Stay Connected by Email Stay Connected by RSS Stay Connected on Twitter Stay Connected on YouTube
ExecuNet on LinkedIn

Editorial Guidelines